Sunday, December 2, 2012

Cool Science Art


When a magnitude 6.8 earthquake shook Olympia, Wash., in 2001, shopowner Jason Ward discovered that a sand-tracing pendulum had recorded the vibrations in the image above.

Seismologists say that the “flower” at the center reflects the higher-frequency waves that arrived first; the outer, larger-amplitude oscillations record the lower-frequency waves that arrived later.

“You never think about an earthquake as being artistic — it’s violent and destructive,” Norman MacLeod, president of Gaelic Wolf Consulting in Port Townsend, told ABC News. “But in the middle of all that chaos, this fine, delicate artwork was created.”

4 comments:

Debra She Who Seeks said...

Creation and destruction are flip sides of the same coin. One does not exist without the other. Wow, pretty New Age-y, eh?

Kal said...

Far out, hippie girl.

V. Furnas said...

That is the beautiful side of destruction. Very cool.

Tempo said...

Interesting....